Departments » Social Studies

Social Studies

SOCIAL STUDIES 8
 
Explores content spanning the 7th century to 1750, such as:
  • social, political, and economic systems and structures
  • scientific and technological innovations
  • philisophical and cultural shifts
  • interactions and exchanges of resources, ideas, arts, and culture between and among different civilizations
  • motivations and consequences of exploration, expansion, and colonization
  • changes in population and living standards

Students will be able to engage in the inquiry process; assess significance of place, people, and events; look at continuity and change throughout history. Also, they will learn to explain different perspectives and make ethical judgements on past and present events, actions, and decisions.
 
 
SOCIAL STUDIES 9
 
Social Studies 9 provides students with a wealth of opportunities to explore concepts which still affect how we perceive our world today. Within this course, students should expect to explore:
  • the dramatic effects of revolution
  • the continuing challenges created by imperialism and colonization throughout the world
  • the shifts and changes of global populations over time
  • the development of modern nation-states, such as Canada
  • conflicts on local, regional, and global scale
  • discriminatory policies, attitudes, and historical wrong-doings
  • the physiographic features of Canada and geological processes

Socials 9 puts special focus on events which have taken place from between 1750 to 1919; such as the Industrial Revolution, British North America, the Gold Rush, World War I, and potentially many other events which have lasting impacts on our world today. Throughout the course, students will come to engage in the inquiry process; assess the significance of place, people, and events; and look an continuity and change throughout history. Emphasis will be put on exploring how we can explain different perspectives and make ethical judgements on past and present events, actions, and decisions.
 
 
SOCIAL STUDIES 10 (SS 10)
 
SS 10 explores the history of Canada and the world from the Canadian Confederation to the end of the Interwar Period.
 
This course has a literary and writing focus. Students will gain further insight into the structure of Canadian government and become aware of Canadian issues on an international stage. Skills such as analysis, critical thinking, research and writing will be honed through investigations of historical and contemporary issues experienced by members in our society, conflicts that have shaped our identity as Canadians, and the differing perspectives and ideas about what it means to be a part of Canadian society.
Included in SS 10 are units on human and physical geography which focus on Canadian environment and the current state of the world through media studies. Students will also be expected to demonstrate their awareness of social responsibility throughout this course.
 
 
SOCIAL STUDIES 11 (SS 11)
 
Prerequisite: Social Studies 10
 
Social Studies 11 explores the history of Canada and the world from the start of World War II up to present day.
 
This course has a literary and writing focus. Students will gain further insight into the structure of Canadian government and become aware of Canadian issues on an international stage. Skills such as analysis, critical thinking, research and writing will be honed through investigations of historical and contemporary issues experienced by members in our society, conflicts that have shaped our identity as Canadians, and the differing perspectives and ideas about what it means to be a part of Canadian society.
This course will include exploration on the state of the world using media on an ongoing basis and an exploration of human geography and its effects on Canadian society. Students will be required to demonstrate personal and social responsibility throughout this course.
 
 
GENOCIDE 12
 
Genocide 12 examines the political, legal, social and cultural ramifications of the intentional destruction of peoples while recognizing that this process in not inevitable, and attempts can be disrupted and resisted various case studies from around the globe and through modern history will help extend and clarify this challenging topic.
 
Students are expected to know the following:
  • Origins and development of the term "genocide"
  • Economic, political, social and cultural conditions of genocide
  • Characteristics and stages of genocide
  • Acts of mass violence and atrocities in different global regions
  • Strategies used to commit genocide
  • Uses of technology in promoting and carrying out genocide
  • Recognition of and responses to genocides
  • Movements that deny the existence of or minimize the scope of genocides
  • Evidence used to demonstrate the scale and nature of genocides
  • International law and enforcement

Note: This course may be offered as a third of an "exploratory" Grade 11 offering (the others to be determined i.e. Philosophy, Social Justice, Economics, Law, etc.)
 
 
COMPARATIVE CULTURES 12 (CCN12)
 
Comparative Civilization 12 focusses on the interrelationships among art, history, culture, and civilization with an emphasis on inquiry-based learning and "hands-on" activities. This broad-based course provides students with a range of experiences and skills that facilitate their understanding of, and sensitivity to, a variety of cultures. It fosters students' awareness of various civilizations throughout the world and their contributions to the sum of human experience. Finally, students will develop an appreciation for diversity within and among cultures, including their own.
 
 
FIRST NATIONS STUDIES (FNS 10)
 
First Nations Studies 10 is for students who are interested in exploring First Nations culture, literature and history.
This course has a literary and writing focus. It is an expectation that students will read at least one novel by an Aboriginal author, as well as short literature that will include stories, legends, poetry and non-fiction. Students will study local, national and international Aboriginal history and culture.
 
Elders and community members from the surrounding reserves will be invited to come in and help us learn about local culture and traditions. This class will include a number of hands-on projects in order to offer an immersive cultural experience.
 
 
B.C. FIRST NATIONS STUDIES (BCFNS 12) *Provincially Examinable Course
 
Prerequisite: Social Studies 10
 
This course satisfies the SS11 credit.
 
B.C. First Nations Studies 12 counts towards the same credit as Social Studies 11. This course is a Social Studies course designed with a specific focus and theme of exploring the traditions and history of B.C. First Peoples. This course is for any student who is interested in learning more about First Nations in B.C.
 
BCFNS 12 focuses on First Nations languages, cultures, and contexts within B.C. history, including oral traditions, creation stories, literature and artistic expressions. This course seeks to incorporate student inquiry and personal connections within all subject matter. Students will look at the history of contact with Europeans from a First Nations perspective within B.C., and the evolving responses and dynamics involved up until present day.
 
B.C. First Nations looks to provide students with greater depth and understanding of First People's leadership, self-determination, and providing students with the tools to become an informed and active participant within their community.
 
 
GEOGRAPHY 12 (GEO 12) *will be offered by video conference
 
Prerequisite: Social Studies 11 or BCFNS 12
 
Geography 12 is an excellent course that helps students understand the physical environment of our planet. Students examine how the four spheres (lithosphere, atmosphere, biosphere, and hydrosphere) interact with each other to create the world in which we live. How do these spheres impact human beings, and how do we impact the environment? We consider the essential understanding that the Earth and humans are in a fine balance together. As the population of Earth grows and we place more and more demands and stressors on the spheres, human beings must determine how our actions can be sustainable.
This course is offered as a Video Conference (DL) course to Lakes District Secondary School, Fraser Lake Elementary Secondary, Nechako Valley Secondary and Fort St. James Secondary students, via FSJSS.
 
 
HISTORY 12 (HI 12)
 
Prerequisite is Social Studies 11
 
History 12 provides a forum in which students, using diverse methods of inquiry, will have the opportunity to form, test, and evaluate hypotheses concerning the forces, events, personalities, and institutions that have shaped the modern world. This course is highly interactive, putting a premium on classroom participation, debate, and critical responses to various texts and media.
 
The course moves chronologically from World War One, World War Two and the Cold War through to the collapse of the USSR (but extends to modern issues of the 21st century as well). Thematically, this course focusses on the Big Six of Historical Thinking concepts to delve more richly into the course content:
 
Historical Significance: How do we decide what is important to learn about the past?
Evidence: How do we know what we know about the past?
Continuity & Change: How can we make sense of the complex flows of history?
Cause & Consequence: Why do events happen, and what are their impacts?
Historical Persepctives: How can we better understand the people of the past?
The Ethical Dimension: How can history help us to live in the present?

Finally, students will research a topic of their own choosing to produce and original thesis for their research essay in APA style. Thus, it is an excellent preparatory course for students interested in pursuing post-secondary education.
 
 
SOCIAL JUSTICE 12
 
Prerequisite: Social Studies 10
 
What is Social Justice? Social Justice is the assurance that the basic human rights of all people are upheld. In this class you will examine social justice issues such as: racism, homophobia, sexism, poverty and globalization.
 
This course is project and research based, with seminar style discussions and readings. Students will have the opportunity to study and discuss social change that has occurred on a global scale. Challenge yourself to become an ethical, socially responsible global citizen!